Civil War – us-history.com http://us-history.com Fri, 20 Dec 2013 14:53:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.4 The Battle of Gettysburg http://us-history.com/the-battle-of-gettysburg/ http://us-history.com/the-battle-of-gettysburg/#respond Fri, 19 Oct 2012 14:35:52 +0000 http://oneclick.i.biz/instances/www.us-history.com/?p=106 The Battle of Gettysburg, fought in Pennsylvania, was one of the biggest events in American history. It was one of the bloodiest battles where thousands of men were left either dead or wounded.

This battle is so important today because it was a turning point for the United States in the civil war. General Gordon Meade led the Potomac soldiers who defeated General Robert Lee’s North Virginian army.

The battle had a political significance as well. The Union gained control of the confederates because they were able to defeat them. The Union was also able to lead General Lee’s army. Why was this important to the United States? The winner in the Battle of Gettysburg gained the power to rule the United States.

The Battle of Gettysburg was important in that president Abraham Lincoln talked about it in his Gettysburg Address. In his speech, held at the Gettysburg National Cemetery, he explained how the Battle of Gettysburg gave a new meaning to the way a war should be undertaken.

The Battle of Gettysburg lasted three days. It began July 1, 1863, and ended on July 3, 1863. There were 93,921 soldiers on the Union side and about 72,000 on the side of the Confederates. Casualties were devastating during the Battle of Gettysburg. The Confederates lost the lives of 23,231 men, and the Union lost 23,051 men. The toughest day of the battle was on the last day when about 12,000 Confederate soldiers took on battle with the Union soldiers at the cemetery. The Union had a significant amount of artillery and attacked strong. Consequently, the Confederates had lost so many soldiers that they had to give up and retreat.

The death of soldiers reached a rate of 51,000. All the soldiers who died during the battle were buried in the Soldier’s National Cemetery, which is now called the Gettysburg National Cemetery.

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Land, Civil Rights and War: American History http://us-history.com/land-civil-rights-and-war-american-history/ http://us-history.com/land-civil-rights-and-war-american-history/#respond Fri, 16 Mar 2012 08:37:54 +0000 http://oneclick.i.biz/instances/www.us-history.com/?p=77 From the end of the Civil War to present, the history of the United States, U.S., has been filled with events that have shaped it. Three major classifications of events from the Civil War to present have left indelible marks on the U.S. On horseback and covered wagon, the U. S. would continue its Manifest Destiny and bring the West into its folds. While land was being gained, groups of the disenfranchised begin their treks to secure civil rights. The third classification from the Civil War to present has been wars.

March on civil rights

March on civil rights

Civil War to present has seen U. S. battle Native Americans for lands of the West. From 1869 to 1876, the U. S. Calvary would engage in 200 skirmishes with various Native American tribes, including the Apache, Sioux, Cherokee and Comanche. Although General Custer experienced defeat at Little Big Horn in 1876, the feared Apache chief, Geronimo, was captured in 1886. Native Americans became one of U.S.’s disenfranchised groups.

From Civil War to present day, disenfranchised groups have fought for civil rights. Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton played major roles in securing rights for women including the right to vote and the right to own property and make contracts. Although, black males gained the right to vote after the Civil War, the Supreme Court’s decision in Plessy v. Ferguson, 1896, sanctioned segregation and condoned Jim Crow laws. In 1954, the Supreme Court ended segregation in its ruling on Brown v. Board of Education. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s nonviolent call to action in the 1960s continued the long haul to achieving Civil Rights for African Americans. Five tribes of American Indians received citizenship in 1901. All Native Americans received citizenship in 1924.

War with American Indians is only one of the wars the U.S. engaged in from the Civil War to present. A war with Spain in 1898 lasted three months and brought Puerto Rico under U.S. control. The Viet Nam War which lasted 10 years, 1963 to 1973, spawned the Hippie movement calling for peace. World War 1, 1914 to 1919, took Americans from home to fight on foreign soil. In 1941, Americans joined World War 11, 1938 to 1945, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Since the attack on the World Trade Center in 2001, the U. S. has been engaged in a war against terrorism centered in Iraq and Afghanistan.

There are many factors that have shaped the U.S from the Civil war to present. Three of these were the desire for land, the fight for civil rights and wars.

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The Declaration of Independence http://us-history.com/the-declaration-of-independence/ http://us-history.com/the-declaration-of-independence/#respond Tue, 13 Mar 2012 14:16:02 +0000 http://oneclick.i.biz/instances/www.us-history.com/?p=17 It’s commonly believed that on July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress signed and adopted the statement known as the Declaration of Independance, although some historians dispute the actual date of the signing, believing that the statement was actually singed on August 22, 1776. This statement proclaimed that 13 American colonies to be a sovereign nation separate and independent from Great Britain. The resolution was put forth by John Adams, and the document itself was composed by Thomas Jefferson. Independence was declared from Great Britain more than a year after the American Revolutionary War had begun in 1775.

Declaration of Independence

Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independance served as an inspiration for President Abraham Lincoln during his tenure. He felt that the principles involved in the Declaration of Independance were essential to the spirit of the United States, and that government should closely adhere to them. President Lincoln did not believe that the statement “all men are created equal” applied only to white men, and that slavery was against the basic tenets of the Declaration of Independance. One of the men who signed the Declaration of Independance, William Whipple, freed his own slaves because he felt that he could not champion liberty while remaining a slave-owner.

The Civil War was largely fought because of Lincoln’s strong belief that the act of owning slaves made a mockery of the Declaration of Independance. A century later, the principles of the Declaration of Indepenance has came into play in much the same way during the Civil Rights Movement as they had during the Civil War.

Other countries have been inspired by the Declaration of Independance as well. Leaders of the French Revolution were aided in the composition of The Declaration of the Rights of Man and Citizen by Thomas Jefferson. The Manifesto of the Province of Flanders directly borrowed language and ideas from the Declaration of Independance, and in 1811, citizens of Venezuela produced a document called the Venezuelan Declaration of Independence. Other countries followed suit, and the Declaration of Independance had a fairly strong international influence during the 19th century.

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